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Archive for the ‘Police Clearance Certificates’ Category

German police clearance may have been forged or faked

January 27, 2012 Leave a comment

A developing story out of New Zealand indicates a government inquiry has been launched into Kim Dotcom’s (born Kim Schmitz) residency as legal experts doubt his alleged clear criminal record.

Dotcom is a German-Finnish computer programmer and businessman who rose to prominence during the dot-com bubble and was convicted of insider trading and embezzlement in its aftermath. He is also known as the founder of Megaupload and its associated websites. He legally changed his surname to Dotcom circa 2005. On January 20, 2012, the New Zealand police placed him in custody under the charges of criminal copyright infringement in relation to his Megaupload website.

German law dictates Dotcom’s convictions should not have been wiped before 2017 and one lawyer believes he may have forged his way into New Zealand.

Arriving in New Zealand, every foreign national must present a police clearance form and until now New Zealand’s Prime Minister John Key has insisted Kim Dotcom’s was clean, but yesterday admitted their background checking process is flawed and that a Government inquiry is underway.

“There’s clearly an anomaly between the way the law is interpreted with tests between residency and the Overseas Investment Act because one looks at convictions and one looks at records and that’s a slightly different test,” says Prime Minister John Key.

Regardless of how the law was interpreted it’s clear that New Zealand’s residency and immigration background check program is severely flawed if source documents are not validated.

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South African Police Clearance Certificate obtained through corruption

November 30, 2011 Leave a comment

Former South African police constable was recently found guilty of corruption for selling “clean” police clearance certificates. Through various South African media sources, a former police constable was fined R10,000 or six months in prison for corruption by the Bellville Specialized Commercial Crime Court this past Monday.

Thanduxolo Mbeke, 31, was sentenced to an additional two years in jail. According to court records, Mbeke accepted a R1500 bribe for a police clearance certificate. He subsequently pleaded guilty.

In November of last year, the Western Cape directorate for public prosecutions authorized a sting operation after Mbeke requested R2000 from bus owner Moosa Moolla.

Moolla reported Mbeke immediately to the Cape Town Central vehicle identification section (VIS), which assisted in the arrest.

A month later, Moolla returned to the VIS and gave Mbeke the money who accepted it and immediately issued a “clean” police clearance certificate without actually checking Moolla’s records.

Conclusion: this recent story exemplifies the need for global and transnational organizations to ensure that screening providers of international or global background screening services comply with required Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and Anti-Bribery compliance requirements. For assistance in evaluating such risk please feel free to contact us.

Malaysian Immigration Department Removes Certificate of Good Conduct Requirement, Oh My!!

October 30, 2011 Leave a comment

Malaysian Immigration Department Removes Certificate of Good Conduct Requirement, Oh My!!

At a time when many countries throughout the Asia Pacific Region are combatting terrorism, illegal immigration, human trafficking, forged identity documents, and Certificates of Good Conduct (criminal record checks) it appears Malaysia may be making it easier for criminals to beat the system.

A recent report from a third-party immigration assistance firm related that the Malaysian Immigration Department recently announced that it will eliminate the requirement for foreign nationals to undergo a Certificate of Good Conduct Certificate process through the  Malaysian Ministry of Foreign Affairs Office when applying for a Residence Pass.

This at a time when Malaysia was upgraded to Tier 2 from Tier 3 in the United Stated Trafficking in Persons (TIP) Report for 2010.

According to the TIP Report the following is a description of the Tier Placements:

TIER 1

Countries whose governments fully comply with the Trafficking Victims Protection Act’s (TVPA) minimum standards.

TIER 2

Countries whose governments do not fully comply with the TVPA’s minimum standards, but are making significant efforts to bring themselves into compliance with those standards.

TIER 2 WATCH LIST

Countries whose governments do not fully comply with the TVPA’s minimum standards, but are making significant efforts to bring themselves into compliance with those standards AND:

a) The absolute number of victims of severe forms of trafficking is very significant or is significantly increasing;

b) There is a failure to provide evidence of increasing efforts to combat severe forms of trafficking in persons from the previous year; or
c) The determination that a country is making significant efforts to bring itself into compliance with minimum standards was based on commitments by the country to take additional future steps over the next year.

TIER 3

Countries whose governments do not fully comply with the minimum standards and are not making significant efforts to do so.

Sri Lanka police introduces SMS service to track status of Police Clearance Certificate

September 5, 2011 1 comment

Sri Lanka PoliceSri Lanka Police on its 145th anniversary yesterday, launched a new service of SMS to track the status of the Police Clearance Certificates (PCCs).

The SMS service, named as Police Clearance Certificate Status Tracking SMS Service, is offered in collaboration with the Information and Communication Technology Agency (ICTA) .

The new service will benefit persons who request police certificates for various purposes such as local and foreign employment.

Under the new system applicants can type PLC(space)CRT followed by the assigned reference number on their mobile phone and send it to 1919 to find out the status of their PCCs.

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